The Dean's Postdoctoral Fellowship - Eligible Departments

The Dean’s Postdoctoral Fellowship sponsored by:
The Office for Diversity Inclusion and Community Partnership and
The Office for Postdoctoral Fellows


Eligible Departments

The Dean's Postdoctoral Fellowship is available only within the basic and social science departments on Harvard Medical School's Quadrangle. Fellowships may take place in research programs or labs of faculty with quad-based faculty appointments.

To see a list of eligible faculty, please click on the department of interest.

Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology
Biomedical Informatics
Cell Biology
Genetics
Global Health and Social Medicine
Health Care Policy
Microbiology and Immunobiology
Neurobiology
Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology
Systems Biology

Institutes

Wyss Institute


The Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBMI)

The Center for Biomedical Informatics (CBMI) at Harvard Medical School (HMS) conducts informatics research with a strong emphasis on translational science informed by innovative computational strategies. Since its founding in 2005, CBMI faculty and research staff have conducted a broad range of funded research projects across the spectrum of medical and genomics research as well as developing innovative educational programs for individuals at various stages of their careers. The Center promotes and facilitates collaborative activities in biomedical informatics among researchers at HMS and its affiliated institutions.

    Quad-based Faculty

  • To be announced.

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The Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology (BCMP)

The Department of BCMP at Harvard Medical School is home to research and teaching focused on understanding the molecular mechanisms of fundamentally important life processes. BCMP offers a broad range of medical and basic research topics using the analytical tools of biochemistry, molecular biology, biophysics, chemical biology, and structural biology. The research interests of the faculty include the structure and function of proteins with particular interest in large multimeric complexes; the control of all stages of gene expression; the mechanisms of DNA replication, recombination, and repair; the organization and regulation of chromatin structure; the biosynthesis of membrane lipids, carbohydrates, and proteins; principles of antibiotic and natural product synthesis, and the induction of morphological and biochemical differentiation of cells. Our faculty is deeply engaged in technology development specializing in new methods for single-molecule studies, optical microscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance and x-ray crystallography approaches for atomic level resolution, protein analysis using mass spectroscopy, use of natural or synthetic organic molecules in biological studies, and high throughput methods for functional studies.

    Quad-based Faculty

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The Department of Cell Biology

The faculty of the Department of Cell Biology has been probing fundamental cell functions through several different perspectives - the mechanistic operation of cellular processes, how protein structure influences protein activities; cell influence by cell-cell, cell matrix and extracellular factors in the surrounding microenvironment in tissues; and cell response to stimuli that provoke or inhibit intracellular pathways and processes. The underlying principle linking our faculty is the belief that significant mechanistic insights into the functional activities of the cell will provide important information relevant to human disease. Our faculty’s research interests include metabolism, therapeutics, cancer, and imaging. The department is strongly committed to the training of young scientists and offers departmental events to enhance the training and mentoring of postdocs including speaker training, weekly trainee presentations, workshops on career options, and secondary mentors for postdocs. 

    Quad-based Faculty

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The Department of Genetics

The faculty of the Department of Genetics at Harvard Medical School is conducting research to address diverse problems, using a variety of approaches and model organisms, unified in their focus on the genome as an organizing principle for understanding biological phenomena. Genetics is perceived more broadly as a way of viewing and approaching biological phenomena. Reflecting the breadth of the field of Genetics, the research interests of our faculty includes (but is not limited to) human genetics of both single gene disorders and complex traits, development of genomic technology, cancer biology, developmental biology, signal transduction, cell biological problems, stem cell biology, computational genetics, immunology, synthetic biology, epigenetics, evolutionary biology, and plant biology. The mission of our department encompasses research and education while serving as a focal point for drawing together and integrating basic and clinical genetic efforts conducted across the university and its affiliated hospitals. The department is strongly committed to supporting its current community of faculty, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students and to securing the best new scientists, setting its sights on new research opportunities in the future.

  Quad-based Faculty

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The Department of Global Health and Social Medicine

The Department of Global Health and Social Medicine is an interdisciplinary basic social science department at Harvard Medical School. Our faculty of scientists and researchers apply social science and humanities research to constantly improve the practice of medicine, the delivery of treatment, and the development of health care policies locally and worldwide. The department is concerned with historical, social, and cultural aspects of health care, poverty, and other adversities intimately interconnected with disease, as well as the moral issues that arise in the practice of medicine today. Our faculty teach and conduct research in the social sciences and humanities relevant to health and illness, health care delivery, and the professional culture of medicine. A major effort is the Global Health Delivery program and developing the science of implementation. We and our partners established the Global Health Delivery program to promote a more effective transfer of the great array of services, knowledge, and other resources for prevention and treatment of disease to the many in need of this help, with particular emphasis on those living in resource-poor settings. The department is strongly committed to the education of undergraduates, medical students, postdoctoral trainees, clinicians, and policy makers. Our worldwide collaborations lead to research and interventions that promote better health both in the United States and globally.

    Quad-based Faculty

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The Department of Health Care Policy

The Department of Health Care Policy (HCP) at Harvard Medical School strives to have its research positively impact “decisions, plans and actions undertaken to achieve specific health care goals within a society” in keeping with the definition of Health Policy by the World Health Organization.   More succinctly, we wish to “advance the science of optimal health policy.”  Our faculty’s research interests include quality, costs and access with particular emphasis on current changes in the financing and delivery approaches in the United States. Our faculty is drawn from the fields of economics, statistics, sociology and medicine.  The department also has affiliated faculty whose offices are off-site (generally in one of the teaching hospitals) but who work with the faculty in HCP in research and/or teaching. The department is strongly committed to training and inspiring the next generation of leaders in the area of health care policy. Throughout its history, HCP has sponsored postdoctoral fellows in statistics, medicine, economics, and sociology. The department also offers extensive formal teaching programs ranging from a required course for first-year medical students to several graduate courses for students in the university-wide doctoral program in health policy.

    Quad-based Faculty

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The Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology

The training and research programs in the Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology - and the recently inaugurated Division of Immunology - at Harvard Medical School are each ranked at the top in their field. Department investigators study fundamental questions in prokaryotic molecular and cellular biology, microbial pathogenesis, immunology, and virology.  The Department provides excellent opportunities for postdoctoral training in a variety of areas including bacterial and viral pathogenesis, cell division, the human microbiome, immune regulation and tolerance, inflammation, and antimicrobial resistance. Postdoctoral trainees prepare for careers in microbial and immunobiological research, clinical practice, and therapeutic development in a supportive and collaborative environment that encourages innovation.  The Department supports state-of-the-art facilities and an excellent environment for collaboration with investigators at World-class institutions like MIT and The Broad Institute as well as HMS affiliated hospitals and the main Harvard campus in nearby Cambridge.

    Quad-based Faculty

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The Department of Neurobiology

The mission of the Department of Neurobiology at Harvard Medical School is to promote research and education to better understand the normal and diseased brains -from molecules to behavior.  Our research programs strive to understand how complex neural circuits are shaped and reshaped during the development of the brain and in the adult brain to generate thoughts and memories, to process sensory information and to drive behavior.  The strength of our department lies in the breadth of our studies - from the molecules that function at synapses, to ion channels and receptors that carry the electrical signal between neurons, to a systems-level approach to sensory experience and behavior.  Our faculty is at the forefront of developing new, innovative technologies such as imaging systems to aid in these studies.  While the emphasis is on fundamental research and training, much of the department’s research has a direct bearing upon diseases of the central and peripheral nervous systems such as Alzheimer’s Disease, Parkinson’s Disease, cerebral palsy, dyslexia, epilepsy, and behavioral disorders.

    Quad-based Faculty

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The Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology

The Harvard Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology (HSCRB) research and teaching mission emphasizes developmental biology, stem and progenitor cell biology, tissue and organ formation, tissue repair, regeneration, immunology, and aging. These topics are studied at the molecular, cellular, and organismic levels across a number of organ systems. Our faculty conducts innovative research that is focused on the development, maintenance, and repair of vertebrate tissues. Emphasis is placed on using these aspects of biology to inform the understanding of human development and disease in clinical and basic science settings through an interactive network of hospital-based and university-based research and education programs. The department’s emphasis on accelerating the path from discovery to therapies to improve human health makes it the perfect place for MD/PhDs to do their research. We offer an outstanding training environment rich in research opportunities in HSCRB labs for undergraduate and graduate students.

    Quad-based Faculty (Click here for list that also includes areas of research)

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The Department of Systems Biology

The Department of Systems Biology at Harvard Medical School focuses on the study of systems of biological components, which may be molecules, cells, organisms, or entire species. Our research aims to understand, in molecular and mathematical detail, how dynamic and complex biological systems behave in space and time. Our faculty and trainees span a wide range of disciplines, including biology, physics, chemistry, mathematics, computer science, and engineering.  Living systems are dynamic and complex, and their behavior may be hard to predict from the properties of individual parts. To study them, we use quantitative measurements of the behavior of groups of interacting components, systematic measurement technologies such as genomics, bioinformatics and proteomics, and mathematical and computational models to describe and predict dynamical behavior. Systems problems are emerging as central to all areas of biology and medicine.

      Quad-based Faculty

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INSTITUTES

The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University

The Wyss Institute aims to discover the engineering principles that Nature uses to build living things, and harnesses these insights to create biologically inspired materials and devices that will revolutionize healthcare and create a more sustainable world. In medicine, the Institute is developing innovative materials, devices, and disease reprogramming technologies that emulate how living tissues and organs self-­‐organize and naturally regulate themselves. Understanding of how living systems build, recycle, and control is also guiding efforts focused on development of entirely new approaches for constructing buildings, converting energy, controlling manufacturing, and improving our environment.

The novelty of the Institute resides in its ability to break down disciplinary barriers  by bringing together world-­‐leading researchers, theoreticians, and technical staff with clinicians and industrial collaborators, creating an environment that facilitates synergy among these investigators. The Institute supports cross-­‐cutting fundamental research that will produce completely unpredictable breakthroughs and lead to development of enabling technologies in the field of bioinspired engineering and their translation into useful products. These technologies have the  potential to transform human healthcare as well as industry, manufacturing, and the environment.

      Quad-based Faculty

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