Aymen Elfiky, MD, MPH

Aymen Elfiky, MD, MPH

2008-2009

Attending Physician, Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital; Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA

Dr. Elfiky is a native of Brooklyn, NY who most recently completed his fellowship training in medical oncology at the Yale Cancer Center. He has received numerous awards and honors, the most notable of which have been a Fulbright Scholarship for his study of the health care sector in Egypt as well as an ASCO Young Investigator Award for his research on renal cell cancer while at Yale University. His fundamental sense of identity as a healer, advocate, and citizen is maintained through his firm commitment to serving and empowering others through such endeavors as architect and founder of the National Initiative for Cancer Eradication (NICE) and devising a national education and HPV vaccination campaign aimed at decreasing the incidence of cervical cancer. In addition, he has committed to orchestrating a series of science fairs aimed at inspiring, mentoring, and nurturing the scientific interests and pursuits of minority children within the United States. While continuing his clinical training and work at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Dr. Elfiky’s long-term objectives include developing national strategies designed to overcome health care disparities as they relate to prostate and other cancer diagnoses, access to standard-of-care therapies, and inclusion in clinical trials.

Dr. Elfiky received his medical degree, along with a combined master’s degree in immunology, from Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO in 2001; he completed his internship in internal medicine at Yale-New Haven Hospital in 2002 and completed his residency training at New York University Medical Center, New York, NY in 2005.

Comprehensive Assessment of Determinants of Minority Cancer Disparities: Results of the ACS/NMA Cancer Disparities Consensus Panel

Abstract:

Racial disparities in cancer constitute both an austere medical crisis and a deadly social injustice.  Cancer inequities pose a multifaceted challenge that bring remarkable opportunities for closing the nation’s health gap in this new era of social, political, and health system transformation.  The NMA and ACS have the partnership capacity to organize and mobilize organizations, communities, government agencies and other stakeholders to reduce and eventually eliminate racial inequities in cancer.   The goal is to fully utilize their organizational capacity to undertake national efforts that will (1) increase evidence-based cancer prevention activities, (2) increase opportunities for early detection and diagnosis, (3) unlock the entry points to state-of-the-art cancer treatment, (4) improve survivorship support, and (5) provide more dignified end-of-life cancer care for African Americans and other underserved groups. 

This project presents a unique opportunity to reexamine existing policies and formulate new ones with the goal of impact on state, national, and institutional policy and practices.  

Preceptor:

Dr. Durado Brooks, Director, Prostate and Colorectal Cancers, American Cancer Society

Sponsoring Organization:

American Cancer Society