2018 Olga M. Jonasson Lecture - A Path Toward Diversity, Inclusion, and Excellence

 

                

Dr. Joan Reede with Dr. Susan Pories

The 2018 Olga M. Jonasson Lecture: "A Path Toward Diversity, Inclusion, and Excellence" was delivered by Joan Y. Reede, MD, MPH, MS, MBA, Dean for Diversity and Community Partnership, Harvard Medical School on October 23, 2018 at the Clinical Congress of the American College of Surgeons in Boston.   

The Olga M. Jonasson Lecture was established in 2007 by The Women in Surgery Committee (WiSC), the friends and colleagues of Olga Jonasson, and women in surgery throughout the country to honor the memory of Olga M. Jonasson, MD, FACS, who died in August 2006. Dr. Jonasson was a true pioneer and a leader in academic surgery, exemplified by her becoming the first woman Chair of Surgery in U.S. history. She was a devoted teacher and mentor to countless numbers of surgeons, both men and women. 


 

Dr. Joan Reede with Visiting Clerkship Program alumni Drs. Juliet Emamaullee and Jerome Byam 


Fostering diversity, inclusion, and excellence in medicine

OCTOBER 23, 2018
Clinical Congress Daily Highlights, Tuesday Second Edition
American College of Surgeons

The 2018 Olga M. Jonasson Lecture explored the path toward diversity, inclusion, and excellence in medicine through the vision of Joan Reede, MD, MPH, MBA, Dean for Diversity and Community Partnership, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA.

Dr. Reede began by discussing how the power of firsts can instigate change. She mentioned Elizabeth Blackwell, the first woman surgeon in the United States, and Rebecca Lee Crumpler, the first African American woman to earn an MD. And she pointed to Olga Jonasson, for whom the lecture is named. Dr. Jonasson, who was the first American woman transplant surgeon, passed away in 2006. In 1969, she performed the first kidney transplant in the state of Illinois.

Dr. Reede argued that diversity is about more than just racial equality and economic justice. It is about gender, disability, and anyone who is marginalized or excluded, she said. And it is important for our youth to understand that there are people who blazed the trails that led us to where we are today, and that they too can blaze their own trails by following their passion. “There is talent out there,” she said. “We need to identify it and nurture it and encourage these individuals to stay the course.”

MORE...